Humanities

Check with your advisor to see how these courses may apply to your degree program.

Not finding a course that meets your needs or fits your interests in the group below? Check out the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences full online course offering for Summer 2021.

AF AM 201 – Introduction to African American Studies

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of African American culture. Includes history, the social sciences, literature, religion, and the arts, as well as conceptual frameworks for investigation and analysis of the African American experience.

AM IN 201 – Native People in American Culture

Perceptions and realities of Native people living in and responding to American society and culture. Topics include representations, contemporary Native identity, literature, the arts, history, film, and issues of diversity. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

AM IN 210 – The Mythic Wild West

Examination of the history of the mythic American West, including how people have thought about the region, the myths that emerged from the West, and the role the mythical West played in the formation of American identity.

CL ST 273 – Greek and Roman Mythology

Survey of the legends, myths of the classical world with emphasis on the principal gods, and heroes, and their relation to ancient social, psychological, and religious practices; some attention may be given to important modern theories.

CL ST 369 – Ancient Egypt

Archaeology and culture of Ancient Egypt from prehistory to Late Antiquity. Exploration of literature, religion, social history, government, and architecture. Discussion of major archaeological sites and methods; examination of interaction with other ancient near eastern and Mediterranean civilizations.

FRNCH 370 – French Studies in English

Author, genre, or period study in French or Francophone history, literature, or culture.Three credits: readings, discussions and papers in English; open to all students. Four credits: required for French concentration credit, supplementary readings and written course work in French.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

GER 371 – The Holocaust in Text, Image, and Memory

Examination of such topics as the origins and expressions of Anti-Semitism in central Europe, the political events and structures of the Holocaust, the reality of ghettos and concentration camps, the impact of technological modernization on the Final Solution, and resistance to the Nazis. Materials will include non-fictional texts, literature, art, and music. Three credits: English, open to all students. Four credits: required for German major credit, supplementary readings and compositions in German. Four credits: required for German concentration credit, supplementary readings and compositions in German. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 201 – Introduction to Western Civilization I

Western civilization from ancient Mediterranean world to 1500. Social and cultural developments; economic and political ideas and institutions; problems of historical change and continuity. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 202 – Introduction to Western Civilization II

Western civilization from 1500 to present. Social and cultural developments; economic and political ideas and institutions; problems of historical change and continuity. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 364 – The Mythic Wild West

Examination of the history of the mythic American West, including how people have thought about the region, the myths that emerged from the West, and the role the mythical West played in the formation of American identity.

HIST 370 – History of Iowa

Survey of major social, cultural and economic developments in Iowa from the late 1700s. Emphasis on minority groups, pioneer life, early economic development, industrial development, educational and religious development, and outstanding personalities.

HIST/US LS 372 – Latina/O History

Historical and cultural heritage of Latinas/os in the United States. The histories of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latin American peoples in the U.S. emphasizing political and cultural convergence and congruencies. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

LING/SPAN 351 – Introduction to Spanish-English Translation

Introduction to the theory, methods, techniques, and problems of translation. Consideration of material from business, literature, and the social sciences. Taught in Spanish. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

MUSIC 102 – Introduction to Music Learning

Expansion of the music listening experiences for the general student through greater awareness of differences in techniques of listening, performance media, and materials of the art. The course focuses on the elements of music: rhythm, melody, harmony, form, and style, and how these elements are used in musics of different cultures and time periods. Ability to read or perform music not required.

MUSIC 304 – History of American Rock and Roll

Rock ‘n’ Roll from the mid 1950s through the 1990s, focusing on the development of rock styles from its roots in blues, folk, country, and pop. Expansion of listening experience through study of song forms, musical instruments of rock, and the socio-political significance of song lyrics. Examinations, research paper or in class presentation required. Ability to read or perform music not required.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

PHIL 230 – Moral Theory and Practice

Investigation of moral issues in the context of major ethical theories of value and obligation; e.g., punishment, abortion, economic justice, job discrimination, world hunger, and sexual morality. Emphasis on critical reasoning and argument analysis.

RELIG 205 – Introduction to World Religions

An introduction to the academic study of religions, including myths, beliefs, rituals, values, social forms. Examples chosen from oral cultures and major religions of the world.

RELIG 210 – Religion in America

Introductory study of the major beliefs, practices, and institutions of American Judaism, Catholicism, Protestantism, and Islam with emphasis on the diversity of religion in America, and attention to issues of gender, race, and class.

RUS 370B – Russian Studies in English Translation: Russian Fairy Tales

Focus on Russian fairy tales. Topics vary according to faculty interest. Author, genre or period study, women writers, cinema, or contemporary theory. Readings, discussions, and papers in English. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

RUS 370R – Studies in English Translation: Russian Topics on Women or Feminism

Topics vary according to faculty interest. Author, genre or period study, women writers, cinema, or contemporary theory. Readings, discussions, and papers in English. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

RUS 375 – Russia Today

A survey of social, political, economic, and cultural topics relevant to contemporary Russia. Readings, discussions and papers in English. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

SPAN 303B – Spanish Conversation and Composition: for Professionals

Intensive oral practice and improvement of oral proficiency. Application of specific grammatical concepts for development of conversational and writing skills within the context of Hispanic culture. Taught in Spanish. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

SPAN 314 – Textual and Media Analyses

Critical reading of Hispanic cultural texts. Presentation of techniques and terminology of textual criticism. Study of basic genres and media-generated artifacts and literary texts. Taught in Spanish. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

SPAN 323 – Spain Today

A survey of social, political, economic, and cultural topics relevant to contemporary Spain. Taught in Spanish. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

THTRE 110 – Theatre and Society

An introduction to Theatre focusing on its relationship with society throughout history.

WGS 201 – Introduction to Women’s Studies

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women’s Studies. Contemporary status of women in the U.S. and worldwide from social, economic, historical, political, philosophical and literary perspectives. Analysis of intersection of gender, race, class, and sexuality. Subject matter includes work, health, sexuality, and violence. Foundation for the other courses in the program.

WLC 278 – Introduction to Global Film

Introduction to the cinema of non-English speaking regions and cultures of the world through representative subtitled films, lectures, and readings. Topics vary according to faculty interest. Emphasis on selected national cinemas and film as a mode of cultural expression as well as on diverse cultural contexts of cinema. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Talk to your Advisor about the possibilities and Discover Your Summer Online!

Student in a Corn Field

Quick Links